The Bal du moulin de la Galette showed a typical scene of late 1800’s working class people, who on a Sunday afternoon, would dress up and while passing time dancing, drinking, and eating galettes. De nombreux moulins à vent rythmaient la vie sur la Butte depuis le Moyen Age. The painting depicts a typical Sunday afternoon at the original Moulin de la Galette in the district of Montmartre in Paris. The painting is now believed to be in a private collection in Switzerland. One is presumably a copy of the original, but it is not known which is the original. From 1879 to 1894 the painting was in the collection of the French painter Gustave Caillebotte; when he died it became the property of the French Republic as payment for death duties. [1] The painting depicts a typical Sunday afternoon at the original Moulin de la Galette in the district of Montmartre in Paris. Open-air dance halls were very popular in 19th-century France and were a great source of entertainment for the people. The Debrays sold their bread to locals, first with a cup of milk and, eventually, with a glass of wine. It is oil on canvas painting measuring 131 x 175 cm. In the late 19th century, working class Parisians would dress up and spend time there dancing, drinking, and eating galettes into the evening. In the middle distance, in the middle of the dance hall, the Cuban painter Don Pedro Vidal de Solares y Cardenas is depicted in striped trousers dancing with the model called Margot (Marguerite Legrand). Analysis of The Swing (La Balancoire) by Renoir. Dance at le Moulin de la Galette is also known as Bal du moulin de la Galette and it is hailed as one of Renoir's most important works of the mid 1870s. For Bal Du Moulin De La Galette (Dance at Le moulin de la Galette) analysis we need to know the context and history of the making of this masterpiece. The location was named for the 17th-century moulin, or windmill, found on-site, which was used to produce flour. Saito caused international outrage when he suggested in 1991 that he intended to cremate both paintings with him when he died. In 1809, the structure was purchased by the Debray family, who used the milled flour to bake galettes, a special type of brown bread. At the time of sale, it was one of the top two most expensive artworks ever sold, together with van Gogh's Portrait of Dr. Gachet, which was also purchased by Saito. Like other works of Renoir's early maturity, Bal du moulin de la Galette is a typically Impressionist snapshot of real life. The location was named for the 17th-century moulin, or windmill, found on-site, which was used to produce flour. Renoir painted both The Swing and Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette in the summer of 1876, at his studio at 78 Rue Cortot, Montmartre. Beside her is a group consisting of Pierre-Franc Lamy and Norbert Goeneutte (also appearing in La balançoire), fellow painters, as well as Rivière himself. A masterpiece of modern art, the Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette is one of the most famous Impressionist paintings and a dazzling example of Renoir's talent for capturing dappled light. Like other works of Renoir's early maturity, Bal du moulin de la Galette is a typically Impressionist snapshot of real life. It is housed at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris and is one of Impressionism's most celebrated masterpieces. [3], Top Ten Most Expensive Paintings Sold At Auction, Claude Monet Painting in His Garden at Argenteuil, Portrait of Irène Cahen d'Anvers (La Petite Irène), Portrait of Ambroise Vollard in a Red Headscarf, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bal_du_moulin_de_la_Galette&oldid=981016555, Articles with unsourced statements from October 2017, Articles containing potentially dated statements from January 2013, All articles containing potentially dated statements, Articles with French-language sources (fr), Wikipedia articles with Joconde identifiers, Wikipedia articles with SUDOC identifiers, Wikipedia articles with WorldCat-VIAF identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 29 September 2020, at 20:00. Situated on the hills to the north of the city Montmartre's rural past could still be detected by the presence of its most famous windmill, the Moulin de la Galetl By the time Picasso first visited “Le Moulin de la Galette is one of these complete summaries of vital observation and luminous atmosphere: the grayness of the dance, the noise, the sun, the dust of an outdoor celebration – the excitement of faces, the carelessness of poses -, a rhythm where pink, light blue, dark blue and black dresses turn and stop – a movement of passion, a winning shadow, a running fire, pleasure and fatigue … From 1896 to … Its modernism derives both from its chosen theme - an ordinary scene of working class Parisians at leisure, during a typical Sunday afternoon at the Moulin de la Galette - as well as its loose Impressionist-style …