If your baby develops a bulge or swelling near his belly button, it might be an umbilical hernia. The clamp is taken off after a day or two, when the umbilical stump has dried and sealed. Strapping is not recommended because it can cause skin irritation or infection. Sometimes the lump might be oozing. An umbilical hernia is often more noticeable when your baby cries or strains to do a poo. Make sure the stump dries properly after bathing. After the cord falls off, if there is tissue remaining, the tissue is called an umbilical granuloma. Your baby is not in any pain from this hernia, and as her tummy muscles get stronger, it normally corrects itself. © 2006-2020 Raising Children Network (Australia) Limited. This usually isn’t dangerous, and it doesn’t hurt your baby. If the cord has not fallen off on its own, your doctor may treat it with a drying medication called silver nitrate. Umbilical hernia. The hernia will heal on its own with or without strapping. Your doctor may use silver nitrate to treat the granuloma if it is small. He will take a stick with silver nitrate on the tip and apply it around the cord to encourage it to dry and fall off. Member organisations are the Parenting Research Centre and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with The Royal Children’s Hospital Centre for Community Child Health. Your midwife puts a plastic clamp or tie on the stump that’s left behind. Use water to keep your baby’s belly button area clean. If your child still has a hernia later on, your doctor may repair it surgically. A hernia is a protrusion through an abnormal opening. This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation (HON) and complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information. If your baby develops a bulge or swelling near his belly button, it might be an umbilical hernia. Fold nappies down and away from the stump if you can. An umbilical granuloma looks like a little red lump and may be covered in yellow or clear discharge. After the cord falls off, if there is tissue remaining, the tissue is called an umbilical granuloma. Other than that, there is generally no treatment required. Keep the cord clean and dry until it falls off. You may be told by some to try strapping the hernia down or placing a coin over it and then taping it in place. You don’t usually need to use soap, creams, antiseptics or alcohol to clean it, and you don’t need to bandage the belly button. Your doctor may use silver nitrate to treat the granuloma if it is small. If this opening doesn’t close, tissue will bulge through, creating an umbilical hernia. See your GP as soon as possible if you’re still seeing sticky liquid several days after the stump has fallen off, if your baby’s belly button area gets hot, red or swollen, and/or if your baby has a fever or is otherwise unwell. Raising Children Network is supported by the Australian Government. This might be clear, sticky or brownish, and it might leave a mark on your baby’s clothes or nappy. It can be hard to clean poo off with just water because baby poo has a lot of fat in it. Wash your hands before handling the cord stump, and avoid touching it whenever possible. Talk to your pediatrician if you notice any signs of infection such as oozing, redness, or a foul smell. Granulomas and hernias are common in newborns and rarely something to worry about. The stump will dry and heal much faster if you expose it to air as much as possible. This usually looks like a small pink or red lump where the belly button should be. While the stump is drying up and just after it falls off, you might notice some oozing around the baby belly button. This is a normal part of the healing process. It might also smell a little. If it is larger, if the nitrate isn’t effective, or if it continues to ooze, your doctor may perform a minor surgical procedure to tie off the granuloma and remove it. This may require a few treatments before it finally falls off. At one point, people believed that this would pop the hernia back in place. Sometimes it takes a week or two. This usually isn’t dangerous, and it doesn’t hurt your baby. Your doctor may instruct you to press on the hernia to make sure that it goes back in place. After your baby’s birth, her umbilical cord is cut. All rights reserved. When the umbilical cord is cut, there is a hole (the umbilical ring) that normally closes. Occasionally, the cord will not fall off on its own or baby will have fleshy tissue, called an umbilical granuloma, remain after the stump has fallen off. An estimated 1 out of 500 newborn babies have an umbilical granuloma. Umbilical hernias are fairly common in newborns. During the first few days after birth, the stump will get darker and shrivel, and will eventually fall off. An umbilical hernia will probably close on its own, but you should still see your GP or child and family health nurse about it. Also talk to your doctor if it has not fallen off on its own within a few weeks. A granuloma looks like a pink ball of tissue. An umbilical granuloma is usually harmless, but you should ask your GP or child and family nurse to have a look at it. Consult your doctor immediately if you cannot massage the hernia back in place, if it is hard, or if your child appears to be in pain from you touching it. Try not to cover it with plastic pants and nappies. Rarely, an umbilical hernia can become a problem if part of the intestines get stuck in the opening and cannot be pushed back into place. If the stump gets wee or poo on it, wash it off using clean water and a pH-neutral cleanser. An umbilical hernia is often more noticeable when your baby cries or strains to do a poo. It is, however, important to watch for signs of infection. Warning: This website and the information it contains is not intended as a substitute for professional consultation with a qualified practitioner. 4 Things Parents of an ADHD Child Want You to Know, Frequently Asked Questions About Miscarriages, © 2003 - 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba JustMommies, Fertility Charting Ovulation and Prediction, Fertility Medications and Natural Supplements. If it is larger, if the nitrate isn’t effective, or if it continues to ooze, your doctor may perform a minor surgical procedure to tie off the granuloma and remove it. The salmon-pink, cobblestone-appearing friable mass that later persists at the umbilicus is termed an umbilical granuloma. If the stump hasn’t fallen off after more than two weeks, you can check with your child and family health nurse. Sometime after your baby is born, usually around two to three weeks of age, your baby’s umbilical cord stump will fall off. A granuloma looks like a pink ball of tissue. An umbilical granuloma is usually harmless, but you should ask your GP or child and family nurse to have a look at it. This is not something to worry about. Never try to pull the stump off yourself, even if it looks like it’s ready to fall off. If your baby’s umbilical cord seems to stick out a lot or you notice it bulging when she cries or strains, she may have an umbilical hernia. Look for ‘pH-neutral’ on product labels, or ask your pharmacist or child and family health nurse to recommend a product. Once the stump has fallen off, some babies can develop an umbilical granuloma.